WAINAO ART TEE SHIRT DAVID BECKHAM REDEMPTION

WAINAO N°9 - REDEMPTION

 WHY NOW? BECAUSE AT ONE POINT, DAVID BECKHAM WAS THE MOST HATED MAN IN THE COUNTRY AND THIS FREE KICK CHANGED EVERYTHING..IT WAS GREAT TO SEE THAT BUT... IN THE SAME TIME IT'S INTERESTING TO SEE HOW QUICK PEOPLE CHANGE THEIR MINDS ABOUT PLAYERS. .   Nobody was more polarizing in england than david beckham. some players have a special relationship with the crowd.
They have such talent that they cristallise hope of an entire country and there's a thin line between love and hate,so when they're disappointed. 
It''s wonderful to see that what made the country fall in love with david beckham, his talent, is what brought him back in their hearts. 

 

LEGEND 1

 

“GOD saves the Queen says the song, but when the last chance is a free kick…… GOD is not the first one we pray ”

 

 

 

LEGEND 2

 

“ If they hate you for a RED CARD....and love you again after a free KICK, the truth is simple: They never really hated you..... OR never really loved you!" 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THAT DAY

OCTOBER 6th 2001: David Beckham capped a heroic performance by equalising for England in the 93rd minute with a stunning free-kick and qualified England for the 2002 world cup in KOREA.
 
 
 
 
 
David Beckham’s career trajectory was changed by one red card
David Beckham remains one of the world’s most recognisable football stars. It’s hard to believe that  years ago, he was the most hated footballer – arguably the most hated man in fact – in the country. And it all stemmed from one simple red card.

After he broke into the Manchester United first team in the 1995/96 season, Beckham really began to rise to fame in the early part of 1996/97. His goal from the halfway line against Wimbledon was the moment that really earmarked him as a superstar in the making. By 1997, Beckham was a mainstay in the England side – he played in all of the qualifiers for the World Cup – and he was also, thanks to his burgeoning relationship with Spice Girl Victoria ‘Posh Spice’ Adams, one of the most famous footballers in the country. He seemed to have the world at his feet.
After a loss in their second group game against Romania left them needing a win against Colombia to qualify for the knockout stages. Beckham was re-introduced as a central midfielder and scored a classic Beckham free-kick – his first goal for England – and the Three Lions won 2-0 .
 England, one the favourite, met the Argentina during 1998 world cup in France. The Argentina-England rivalry was real and English desperate to avenge the defeat of the 1986 world Cup. the game got off to a flying start. With the game at 1-1 following two early penalties, the game was on a knife-edge going into the second half. Just two minutes into the half, things changed for Beckham. Sent sprawling by a rough tackle from Diego Simeone, Beckham’s response was to lash out with a petulant flick. Simeone naturally acted like he had been hit really hard. The referee saw it as an unlawful act of petulance and showed Beckham the red card .
 
England went on to lose the game in a penalty shootout, despite Sol Campbell’s apparent winner being mistakenly ruled out by the ref. But despite Paul Ince and David Batty missing the crucial penalty kicks, in the eyes of the fans and media only one man was to blame – Beckham. Being a dead ball specialist, Beckham would have been one of the five penalty takers during the shootout and would have been expected to score.  “Ten heroic lions, one stupid boy” was the headline in one newspaper. Even Hoddle seemed to throw him under the bus, stating that it was the red card that had cost England the game.
 Upon returning from the World Cup, Beckham was greeted with hatred never before seen in English football. It was the most challenging 12 months of his life. He’d be subjected to the biggest hate campaign any England player has ever had to face Effigies of him were hung at grounds across the country and he took a phenomenal amount of abuse at every game.
. At that moment in 1998, Beckham was the most hated man in England. Even in his own home, he no longer felt safe. “People were waiting for me in the car park – hundreds of them, anger all over their faces,” Beckham later said. The vitriol continued throughout the 0-0 draw, his every touch booed as home fans chanted ‘We hate Beckham’ and ‘You let your country down’. “I’ve got this photo at home that still spooks me,” explained Beckham. “I’m taking a corner and you can see the expression on people’s faces in the crowd. It wasn’t: ‘You’re a crap footballer who cost us the World Cup’. It was way past that – it was: ‘If we could, we’d have you, Beckham’.”  
When Sven-Goran Eriksson took over, Beckham remained in the role and slowly but surely, as he scored more goals and took more responsibility, the fans began to get back on his side. That’s when happen the redemption moment.

England went into their final qualifier against Greece needing at least a point to qualify without needing the playoffs, but for most of the game, that point seemed beyond them. Greece took the lead in the first half and while Teddy Sheringham seemed to have rescued it late in the second, the Greeks scored again to put England back in jeopardy. It was one of the worst England performances in a long time but Beckham simply would not give in. At times it seemed like he was the only England player on the pitch as he tried to do everything himself, shooting from distance and even going on rare dribbles through the Greek defence. With seconds remaining on the clock, England were given a free-kick on the edge of the box.
  Nothing less than a goal would do. Beckham placed the ball down, Sheringham came over for a quick discussion but Beckham had earned a reputation as one of the best free-kick takers in the world. Starting out to the right, it dipped suddenly to the left to avoid the Greek wall and from there gathered momentum all the way to the top left-hand corner. Deceived completely by the curl, goalkeeper Antonis Nikopolidis remained rooted to the spot as it hit the net. Beckham hit probably the greatest free-kick in his career. David Beckham's 93rd-minute free-kick at Old Trafford , took England to the World Cup finals in Japan and South Korea.He had gone from the most hated man in the country to the conquering hero, the saviour of a nation.
  
the free-kick remains his defining moment. But strangely enough, I’d argue that maybe it couldn’t have happened had he not been sent off against Argentina in the World Cup. "Top five career moments: One of them would be getting the red card in 1998 because it was a moment where it was difficult for me as a player and as a person, but it made me mature very quickly," Beckham said.
 
To know more about the subject:
 
 
Beckham's Darkest Hour". Article on official UEFA website. Archived from the original on 12 January 2006. Retrieved 6 October 2005.
David Beckham Biography: Soccer Player (1975–)". Biography.com (FYI / A&E Networks). Retrieved 1 September 2016.
Baldi, Ryan (18 September 2019). "The art of free-kick taking: Sebastian Larsson on Messi, Ronaldo and why David Beckham is still the best". The Independent. Retrieved 3 April 2020.
Winter, Henry (1 July 1998). "World Cup 1998; Argentina 2 England 2, Argentina win 4–3 on pens: match report". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 12 September 2014.
Beckham, David; Watt, Tom (2003). Beckham: Both Feet on the Ground. HarperCollins